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Archive for January 2011

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January 25, 2011 Posted by Bay in Blog

New Musical Explosions!

Hey cats and kittens!

We've been having regular band meetings to plot out 2011 and we all agree that we want to focus on writing new songs. We love our record and will continue playing those songs, but they were all written before Alex and Joe joined the band. Now that we've toured and become the kind of live band we've always wanted to be, we're going to start writing songs that take advantage of that!

Of course, this means we probably won't be playing any shows for at least the next month or two so we can focus on writing. We want to play new songs for you next time we hit the stage!

We've begun working with a new producer and have reached out to a few more that we'd love to work with. As soon as we have something that we love enough to share with you, we'll figure out a way to stream it to you to get your feedback.

We just thought you should know that we're hard at work and we'll keep you posted with our adventures in the studio.

lots of love,

Bay

AltPress.com article on band merch featuring Bay Dariz



Recently, 3OH!3’s Nathaniel Motte penned a thoughtful, lengthy blog on his band’s website decrying the practice of “price matching.” The blog was spawned from a specific instance at a holiday radio show in Sacramento, California, where 3OH!3 were required to price their shirts at a equivalent cost to the headliner’s merch—an amount Motte and bandmate Sean Foreman deemed too expensive for their fans. The incident, which Motte describes in detail in his post, is indicative of a larger issue, one that affects bands and music fans across the board. Motte’s post raises a slew of intriguing questions: What is price matching? Why is it done? Who does it benefit and who does it harm? And, most importantly, what is and what should be the purpose of selling merch?

In simple terms, price matching is a practice in which the headlining band on a tour set the merch prices. If that band sell their T-shirts for $40, every other band on the bill must comply with that price. DAVID GALEA of The Agency Group, who books Paramore, Dredg, Relient K and Four Year Strong, explains that price matching is just one element the headliner controls in the business of touring. “The headliner dictates everything from production to amount of merch items, to number of comps the support gets, to how long they play,” he says. “It is common practice for support acts to fall in line with what the headliner is dictating on any and all things—from clubs to arenas.”

3OH!3 manager MIKE KAMINSKY describes price matching as “a request from the headlining band asking the support bands not to undercut them in merch. It looks bad—and could affect sales—if one band is selling their merch for considerably less than another [band]. It’s essentially forcing a monopoly in the market for that show."

The ability of the headliner to determine all these aspects on a tour is a privilege that Galea believes must be earned, and that there should be a balance between respecting the band taking you on tour with them and standing up for your own fans once you’ve built a fanbase. “Simply put, that is the right of the headliner, and they have earned this right,” Galea says. “A first-of-four [act] on a show complaining about the practices of a headliner, frankly, is inappropriate. This isn’t utopia; from the biggest band to the smallest band, this still acts as a business, and any band who tells you different is probably lying to save face.”

For a smaller, up-and-coming band, each T-shirt and album sold at a show can mean gas and food for the next day. In that scenario, being forced to sell your shirts at a higher price can mean you don’t sell any, which in turn hurts your ability to travel to the next venue. BAY DARIZ, singer/guitarist for Los Angeles band SOME HEAR EXPLOSIONS, has found that sometimes there is little thought about the fact that merch sales directly allow small bands to literally continue touring. “The money from merch goes directly into our gas tank to get us to the next city,” he says. “It's extremely important we sell enough merch to keep going. Many times people want free shirts and CDs, and I don't think they realize how expensive touring is and how little money we really make. We don't travel with a crew, so we do all our own merch sales. We have to become salespeople as well as artists/performers, and that's a tightrope to walk sometimes.”

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[continue reading at AltPress.com]

Read the full article at www.altpress.com - click here...